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Need some professional advice? Here are 20 fact-filled articles to help you compete in today's fierce employment market:

Resumes
Ten Keys to a Dynamite Resume
Resume Design Tips and Template
A Stronger Resume To Increase Your Odds 
Choosing a Resume Format: Summary vs. Chronological 
Beefing Up an Anemic Resume 
The Dangers of Resume Overkill

Interviewing
The Secret to Interview Success  
Don't Talk Yourself Out of a Job  
How to Answer Interview Questions
What to Ask the Interviewer
Four Classic Interview Questions—and How to Prepare for Them
Discussing the Subject of Money

Career Decisions
How to Evaluate a Job Offer
What Does the New Job Really Pay?
Salary Negotiation Techniques
Intelligent Job-Changing Strategy
Career Strategy: It Pays to Diversify

Transition
The Proper Way to Resign
How to Leave a Job Gracefully
Resignation or Retaliation?

Don’t Talk Yourself Out of a Job
By Bill Radin

There are two ways to answer interview questions: the short version and the long version. When a question is open-ended, I always suggest to candidates that they say, “Let me give you the short version. If we need to explore some aspect of the answer more fully, I’d be happy to go into greater depth, and give you the long version.”

The reason you should respond this way is because it’s often difficult to know what type of answer each question will need. A question like, “What was your most difficult assignment?” might take anywhere from thirty seconds to thirty minutes to answer, depending on the detail you choose to give.

Therefore, you must always remember that the interviewer’s the one who asked the question. So you should tailor your answer to what he or she needs to know, without a lot of extraneous rambling or superfluous explanation. Why waste time and create a negative impression by giving a sermon when a short prayer would do just fine?

Let’s suppose you were interviewing for a sales management position, and the interviewer asked you, “What sort of sales experience have you had in the past?”

Well, that’s exactly the sort of question that can get you into trouble if you don’t use the short version/long version method. Most people would just start rattling off everything in their memory that relates to their sales experience. Though the information might be useful to the interviewer, your answer could get pretty complicated and long-winded unless it’s  neatly packaged.

One way to answer the question might be, “I’ve held sales positions with three different instrumentation companies over a nine-year period. Where would you like me to start?”

Or, you might simply say, “Let me give you the short version first, and you can tell me where you want to go into more depth. I’ve had nine years experience in instrumentation product sales with three different companies, and held the titles of district, regional, and national sales manager. What aspect of my background would you like to concentrate on?”

By using this method, you telegraph to the interviewer that your thoughts are well organized, and that you want to understand the intent of the question before you travel too far in a direction neither of you wants to go. After you get the green light, you can spend your interviewing time discussing in detail the things that are important, not whatever happens to pop into your mind.

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